The Importance of Sleep in Memory Processing

Graham Diering, a researcher and postdoctoral fellow at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, recently led a study which demonstrated the importance of sleep in new memory storage and formation. The study used mice as subjects, but the evidence...

/ July 20, 2017

Beyond the Frontiers of Pain Medicine: A Novel Outlook

Unlike most other anesthesiologists, the idea of simply administering treatment to alleviate pain was not enough for the director of the pediatric pain management program at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, Dr. Irfan Suleman. Having successfully managed cases in which...

/ July 16, 2017

Will the New African CDC Repeat the Bureaucratic Mistakes of the Ebola Outbreak?

The Ebola virus left the African continent in shock, killing over 11,000 in the worst outbreak since the emergence of HIV/AIDS (Mezher, 2015). Although thousands of volunteers, international peace-keepers, and physicians collaborated to fight Ebola, more efficient overseeing bodies could...

/ July 15, 2017

The War on HIV in the Philippines

While the overall rate of HIV infections has been gradually decreasing in Asia in recent years due to aggressive awareness and preventions programs, the Philippines remains an exception. In fact, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) estimated that...

/ July 10, 2017

How the Center for Disease Control and Prevention Keeps America Safe in the 21st Century

Headquartered in Atlanta Georgia, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is a federal agency under the Department of Health and Human Services responsible for the protection of public health and safety. The CDC was founded in 1946 after...

/ July 8, 2017

Words on Death and Dying

What is death? Or more importantly, what does it really mean to die? Doctors and nurses confront mortality every day at work, but so does everyone else who lives—or rather, exists—in the present. Death is often considered a taboo subject,...

/ July 3, 2017

The History of the fMRI

If you read any contemporary research papers concerning neuroscience and cognition, you’ll likely find some mention of fMRI (functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging). An fMRI scans portions of the brain to record levels of activity in those areas as subjects perceive...

/ June 30, 2017

Fighting with Limits: A New Horizon

Unfortunately, setting your priorities isn’t always easy – especially when thousands of lives depend on your decisions.  In the world of diseases, deciding which illness to address first can prove crucial to a country’s future.  However, agreeing on the actual...

/ June 25, 2017

The “Sandwich” Method: A New Technique in Ventral Hernia Repair

Ventral hernias, a common complication in nearly 10% of all open abdominal surgeries, occur when abdominal tissue or organs protrude through a gap between the muscles of the abdominal wall ( 1 ). Of the 350,000 to 500,000 ventral hernia...

/ June 24, 2017

An Unconventional Weapon and the Dual-Use Dilemma

The deployment of chemical weapons is an ongoing issue of international concern, which resurfaced not long ago in Kim Jong-Nam’s assassination and the Syrian sarin attack in early April. Here, the implications of chemical warfare and steps taken to prevent...

/ April 21, 2017